Tag Archives: technology

Consortium plans to turn carbon dioxide emissions into aquaculture feed

Carbon dioxide emissions from oil refineries in Mongstad will be used to grow algae for fish feed
Carbon dioxide emissions from oil refineries in Mongstad will be used to grow algae for fish feed

By next year, a prototype facility should be operating in Norway which will use carbon dioxide from oil refineries to grow algae for fish feed.

The facility will be built by the CO2BIO consortium of companies, which includes feed manufacturers, salmon farmers, universities and investors.

The Norwegian government has also committed funds to the project.

Algae is a growing source of protein for fish feed manufacturers, who have drastically reduced the amount of protein from wild fisheries in their feed diets during the past decade.

Algae growing in pipes fed by carbon dioxide.
Algae growing in pipes fed by carbon dioxide.

NEWS SOURCE: Undercurrent News

No Fukushima radiation health risk from Canadian fish

The dangers of radiation from the Fukushima disaster have been greatly overblown thanks to things such as this image, which have wrongfully been used to represent radiation from Japan.
The dangers of radiation from the Fukushima disaster have been greatly overblown thanks to things such as this image, which have wrongfully been used to represent radiation from Japan.

A new study published this spring shows that there is no radioactive material from Fukushima in salmon and groundfish.

None of the fish samples analysed in this study contained any detectable levels of 134Cs and 137Cs under given experimental setting with a detection limit of ∼2 Bq kg−1. Fish (such as salmon and groundfish) from the Canadian west coast are of no health concern for both radiation contaminants and naturally occurring radionuclides.

As simulations predicted, in the near future, the radioactive water plume could reach the areas where these fish are rearing(1). Even in this case, it is expected that levels of radioactive contaminants in fish will remain well below Health Canada guidelines for food and likely still below the detection limit of a few Bq kg−1. Nonetheless, further monitoring of 134Cs and 137Cs, especially the long-lived 137Cs, in ocean water and seafood will help confirm these assessments and ensure public safety.

It’s safe to assume that farmed fish grown in the same waters also pose no health concern when it comes to Fukushima radiation.

Read the full study here.